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Themes of Beauty in the Word (IV) by Stratford Caldecott

Themes of Beauty in the World  (IV)

 
by Stratford Caldecott
 
9/12/12
 
[My recent book, Beauty in the Word, a sequel to Beauty for Truth’s Sake, is quite dense and complicated, so I thought it would be helpful to readers if I produced a “study guide”. So, in a series of posts, I look at some of the key themes and ideas in the book.]4. The Mother of the Liberal Arts. In the ancient sources, Wisdom or Sapientia (Greek Sophia) is sometimes identified with Christ, and he is shown standing or seated on the lap of Mary as the Seat of Wisdom. But often Sapientia is a female figure, and as such she is regarded as the “mother” of the seven liberal arts by Cassiodorus and Alcuin.

In the book, there is a section – the Endnote starting on p. 153 – where I explore this idea, along with the meaning of Beauty and the other Transcendentals that converge on God. I argue that the “Wisdom” of God can be identified with Beauty as something inherently “liberating”. The Beauty or Glory of God corresponds at its highest point with the divine Infinity, the fact that God’s own being is inexhaustible and therefore he is a continual delight to himself, a source of eternal rejoicing, of bliss. So the joy we associate with Beauty is a pointer to the depths of Being in God. And this Beauty is ultimately the same as that “Wisdom” described in the Books of Proverbs and Wisdom as being by God’s side from the very beginning, perhaps as the divine idea of creation itself, or as a sort of “uncreated nature”.
“For wisdom is more moving than any motion: she passeth and goeth through all things by reason of her pureness. For she is the breath of the power of God, and a pure influence flowing from the glory of the Almighty: therefore can no defiled thing fall into her. For she is the brightness of the everlasting light, the unspotted mirror of the power of God, and the image of his goodness” (Wisdom 7:24–6).
 
The book tries to trace the way each of the “ways” of the Trivium contributes to the growth in wisdom. Through the mastery of language in memory, thought, and conversation, we become able to grow into our humanity, discovering a wider world and able to discern truth from falsehood, astute in judgment, in communion with others. But the process of education can be corrupted when its aims are lowered from the attainment of wisdom and subordinated to that of a career, or when the very possibility of attaining truth is denied on all sides.Wisdom is the inspiration and the goal of the Liberal Arts, which are the “seven pillars” of the house of rejoicing, and love, and freedom. Each of the Arts was meant to prepare the ground of the body, soul, and spirit of man for the freedom in truth that comes from the knowledge of God, only finally attained when philosophy and theology give way to contemplation and union. For “we know that when he appears, we shall be like him, since we shall see him as he is” (1 John 3:2). 

 
Reprinted with the permission of Beauty in Education.
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