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“Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it.” by Fr. George W. Rutler

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FROM THE PASTOR
April 19, 2015
by Fr. George W. Rutler

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Even in this Easter season, there are those who would nervously employ the secular convention of saying that they want Christ but not his Church, and that they can confess their sins to God without confessing to a priest. This ignores what Jesus did when he rose from the dead: he constructed the Church through his teaching during the forty days before the Ascension, and the first thing he did when he appeared to the apostles was to give them authority to forgive sins in the Sacrament of Reconciliation.

Saint John wrote that not all the books in the world could contain what Christ did in those forty days, but the Gospel accounts tell all that he wants us to know. The power of what he taught the apostles in that brief time, with the wounds still in his body, is clear in the fact that all of them, save John himself, died brave deaths proclaiming the Resurrection.

Such dying, predicted by Christ, has perdured through all subsequent ages in one way or another. Last week, Pope Francis marked the one hundredth anniversary of the massacre of about 1.5 million Armenian Christians by the Turks, abetted by Imperial German staff officers serving with the Ottoman Empire. The Pope said that “it is necessary, and indeed a duty” to “recall the centenary of that tragic event . . . Concealing or denying evil is like allowing a wound to keep bleeding without bandaging it.” The greatest number of killings occurred on appalling death marches of hundreds of miles where the Turks drove women, children and old people (most of the young men had already been massacred) into the Syrian desert. There was no food or water given to the victims along the way—and this was done by design.

Saint Paul, converted by the risen Christ, had evangelized his Turkish homeland. Despite centuries of persecution by Muslims, in 1914 some 15% of the Turkish population was Christian. Today the Christian community is practically non-existent. Persisting in its denial of the persecution, the Turkish government condemned the honesty of Pope Francis by withdrawing its ambassador to the Holy See. That exercise in denial was not singular. In 2010, a declaration was introduced in the House of Representatives calling the systematic eradication of the Armenians a genocide. The Obama administration blocked it.

The mentality that denies the Resurrection, also denies the consequences of such denial. The Resurrection is not about spring flowers and butterflies, and Jesus made that clear by retaining the wounds in his glorified body. Christ triumphed over Satan, and to deny that is to give Satan a leg up in the governance of nations and the attitudes of people. The dominant religion of Turkey maintains that Jesus was not crucified. If not crucified, then not risen. And if not risen, then mankind has license to sink to its lowest depths by crushing life and spreading death.
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The fugitive beauty of the lilies of the field by Fr. George W. Rutler

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FROM THE PASTOR

March 29, 2015
by Fr. George W. Rutler
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It seems to me that greatness exists on two levels. One is that of those who do important things for the general society. Historians may debate whether this encompasses bad as well as good things. After all, there have been figures in history who were called great because they affected the world importantly, if dolorously. Napoleon changed the world in many ways, but he did so cruelly at the cost of hundreds of thousands of lives and the exaction of unimaginable suffering. Then there have been those who saved civilization from near calamity.

If greatness as moral good is not part of the calculus, then bad men as well as good can be called great, if their influence was vast, whether for the good or for the bad. Stalin and Mao Tse Tung, for instance, killed more people and imposed more horrors than anyone else in history, but through the lens of moral indifference, they were great figures, if only because their crimes were on such a scale.

From a moral perspective, greatness is the peculiar laurel of those who have not done things on a great scale, but who did things that were good in defiance of things bad. As a teenager, I had already decided that Winston Churchill was a great man for the good, so in 1961 I persuaded my father—the greatest of men in my life—to accompany me into Manhattan to see Churchill when he visited Bernard Baruch. There was no conversation, only a nod and pleasing comment. It was all I needed for contact with greatness.

Later I read that Churchill thought the three most regrettable sadnesses were those of lives worn down by toil, worry and boredom. For all his hard work and worries and boring years as a man scorned, he was never worn down by them. That is a matter of natural virtue and a key to moral greatness. Yet Jesus was more than a great man that way. When he entered Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, some—guileless children and wizened elders—cheered him as a great man, but he was more than that, and anyone who defines him as only that misses the point. His divine nature, perfectly united with his human nature, exulted in common carpentry, just as much as he did in summoning all the galaxies into existence from the first light. His human worries were a descant on his insight into how heavy human hearts missed the fugitive beauty of the lilies of the field. Nothing bored him: not a single sparrow, nor a hair on a head.

The Palm Sunday crowds soon disappeared. Those who remained were transformed: work would be a votive offering and not a burden; worry would gentle into prudence; and boredom would be banished. For proof, there is the fact that Jesus the toiler would not worry about what the Father had prepared. And he who never was bored was the only man who never bored anyone.
Make a Donation, of any amount, to the Church of St. Michael.

Our website is http://www.StMichaelNYC.com

St. Patrick’s Day: Revenge of the Druids? by Fr. George W. Rutler

 

 
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FROM THE PASTOR
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March 15, 2015
by Fr. George W. Rutler
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Maewyn Succat did not have an easy time embracing the Faith. Although his father Calpurnius was a deacon, Maewyn indulged a spirited youthful rebellion against what he had been taught, and it was only after being kidnapped by superstitious people called Druids that he realized the difference that Christianity makes in the souls of men and the character of cultures. This was in the fifth century, and Maewyn, probably born in the Cumbria part of England near the Scottish lands, was roughly contemporary with the bishop Augustine in North Africa who watched the decay of the Roman Empire. Maewyn eventually became a bishop in Rome where Pope Celestine I re-named him Patricius, the “Father of His People.” His people were to be in the land of Eire where he had suffered in virtual slavery.

Patrick was neither the first nor the only one to bring the Gospel there. Foundations were also laid by such missioners as Palladius, Ciarán of Saighir, Auxilius, Secundinus and Iserinus. One reason Patrick was sent to Ireland was to stem the spread of the Nestorian heresy, which misrepresented the “hypostatic union” of Christ as true God and true Man. A couple of centuries later, Nestorians in the East would influence Mohammed’s misunderstanding of Christ. Patrick was not subtle when it came to the truth: “That which I have set out in Latin is not my words but the words of God and of apostles and prophets, who of course have never lied. He who believes shall be saved, but he who does not believe shall be damned. God has spoken.”

If Patrick, whom the archdiocese of New York is privileged to invoke as its patron, could witness what has become of his feast in the streets of our city, he might think that the Druids were having their revenge. He certainly would decry the notion that his feast was merely a celebration of an ethnic identity which was not his, or of a conviviality not rooted in Christian moral reason. This Saint Patrick’s Day, Maewyn/Patricius would bond more instinctively with the beheaded and crucified martyrs in the Middle East and Nigeria (whose official patron is Patrick) now spilling their blood for Christ, than with some revelers on Fifth Avenue who pantomime his name while spilling beer. There is a difference between martyrs and leprechauns.

This is not to dampen good spirits and rightful celebration, risky though they are in these Forty Days when the shadow of the Cross looms larger daily. But it is a reminder of the cost of discipleship in a cynical culture, and of the heavy cost of succumbing to the threats of the morally bewildered who, with adolescent petulance, would intimidate the Church that carried the Gospel across the Irish Sea. Patrick said when he braved the dark pagan groves: “If I be worthy, I live for my God to teach the heathen, even though they may despise me.”
Make a Donation, of any amount, to the Church of St. Michael.

Our website is http://www.StMichaelNYC.com

“Whoever wishes to be great among you must be your servant” by Fr. George W. Rutler

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FROM THE PASTOR
February 8, 2015
by Fr. George W. Rutler

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“Says who?” That challenge to authority is not confined to adolescents. It is a valid question, provided one wants a legitimate answer. The right use of authority is a staple of civilized order, and its abuse is the engine of the worst civil crimes. That is why our government has a system of checks and balances.

The source of Christ’s authority was the big question when he healed and forgave sins. He taught “as one with authority and not as the scribes.” When accused of using Satan as the source of his authority over evil spirits, he replied that a house divided against itself cannot stand, and when Pilate invoked his own authority, the Lord told him that he would have no authority at all were it not “given from above.” Conflicted, Pilate on his grand judgment throne suddenly seemed shriveled by Christ’s innocence, and he surrendered his authority to the mob. Here was Shakespeare’s “Man, proud man, dressed in a little brief authority.”

In Pilate’s civil order, his authority had been delegated in a pragmatic system for promoting “the tranquility of order” according to natural law. By contrast, Christ’s authority was intrinsic because it was divine. So it is with the Church he established when he gave the heavenly keys to Peter. There are three options in response: to deny his authority, to attack it, or to embrace it.

Entrusted with divine authority, the Church, when true to herself, respects the free will with which man is endowed, so when it comes to matters of faith, she “proposes and does not impose.” But faith itself is not enough. As St. Paul warned the Corinthians, one can speak with the “tongues of men or of angels” but can still sound like a “banging gong or clanging cymbal.” To produce results, the human response to the divine summons must be activated by love. Saint Augustine said: “Faith is mighty, but without love it profits nothing.”

Satan and his evil spirits that “prowl the world” have faith in Christ in the sense that they have no doubt that he is divine. “I know who you are.” Satan’s endless agony is that his knowledge of God is divorced from love of God. We risk courting that misery if we consider God as a power without logic. Such a god was what Pope Benedict described in his classic Regensburg Address: a god who is absolute will, without any identity beyond sheer power. Such is the god of terrorists, creating rage in a culture that is unable to deal with logic.

The Divine Word who authored all things into existence speaks with authority without being authoritarian: “You know that those who are regarded as rulers of the Gentiles, lord it over them, but it must not be so with you. Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you must be your servant” (Mark 10:42-43).
Make a Donation, of any amount, to the Church of St. Michael.

Our website is http://www.StMichaelNYC.com

Ecclesiastes: Eat, Drink, and Be Merry by Fr. George W. Rutler

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FROM THE

.PASTOR
February 1, 2015
by Fr. George W. Rutler

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When William F. Buckley, Jr., was asked why he slouched so much, he said it was because he was bent under the weight of all the wisdom he carried. One gets the impression that the author of Ecclesiastes, one of the twenty-four “Writings” of the Old Testament, must have been very bent over under such wisdom, but he does not seem to have been the sort to make amusing, self-deprecating comments. He is deeply serious, and his counsels are thoroughly sobering, even when he advises us to “eat, drink and be merry” (Ecclesiastes 8:15), because that seems the only way to make the best of a bad day. Ecclesiastes is the Latin version of the Greek translation of the Hebrew Koheleth, which means “Gatherer,” for the author gathers wisdom from his own experience. Yet this wise man does not seem to have taken pleasure in writing so many wise things, for he sighs: “Of making many books there is no end, and much study wearies the body” (12:12).

I can sympathize with that, but there are some books that are relatively painless for an author, if not for all his readers. This month I have a new book that was not wearisome to write, first because it is not long, and second because it is a meditation on the parables of our Lord. While my words may be faulty, his words “shall never pass away,” and I felt safe in hiding behind them. It was the publisher’s suggestion to name it “Hints of Heaven” because the parables are precisely that: ways the Master gives his followers clues, by various images, to the mysteries of heaven. Even an inspired writer like Ecclesiastes did not come from heaven, so while his wisdom is divinely inspired, it is not divine. Thus, for instance, in one of his parables, the Lord quotes Ecclesiastes about “eating and drinking and being merry” (Luke 12:16-21), but with a whole other meaning.

The first parables are from the period between the second and third Passovers of his ministry, following the Sermon on the Mount, and are about spreading the Good News of eternal life. In the third year of his ministry, he tells parables about God’s mercy. Approaching the Passion, his parables are about the Second Coming, the Day of Judgment, the penalties for arrogance and the rewards for humility.

The late Orthodox theologian, Alexander Schmemann, who instructed me briefly, said, “Books and words, created quite recently, yesterday and the day before, have become outdated, have fallen into nonexistence. They no longer say anything to us; they are dead. But these ingenuous stories, so simple in appearance, live on, full of life. We listen to them, and it is as if something happens with us, as if someone has glanced into the very depth of our life and said something which relates only to us, to me.”
Make a Donation, of any amount, to the Church of St. Michael.

Our website is http://www.StMichaelNYC.com

“Homo faber” – Man the Builder by Fr. George W. Rutler

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FROM THE PASTOR
January 25, 2015
by Fr. George W. Rutler

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The great edifices of classical cultures are also morally edifying by their anonymity. The artists and artisans who embellished them are generally unknown because they were honoring something greater than themselves.

The desire to be known, however, is not unworthy of human dignity, provided it is not just selfish pride. Homo faber, man the builder, is entitled to take just satisfaction in an accomplishment, provided thanks for the inspiration are accorded to the Divine Inspirer.

Humility refers all things to God, but it dispenses with the false modesty, like that of Dickens’ Uriah Heep, that solicits praise but pretends not to want it. When Michelangelo carved his name very visibly on his Pietà, he wanted people to know that God had done a great thing through him. That is different from those who want their names known just to advertise themselves. “Their inward thought is that their houses shall continue forever, and their dwelling places to all generations; they call their lands after their own names” (Psalm 49:11).

Once a man desires to please God first, he will begin to understand that he is not just a statistic in the divine regard. “Non nobis, Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam—Not unto us Lord, but unto thy name give the glory.” St. Paul warned St. Timothy not to be a “man pleaser” because that distracts from the primary relationship with God who made us for his delight. To be dependent on human recognition is to forfeit the radical dignity that God alone gives us. “We love him because he first loved us” (1 John 4:19).

No one wants to receive mail addressed only to “Occupant.” Christ does not address us as statistics, the way a bureaucrat does. St. Paul wrote his epistles to churches composed of individuals, each of whom he was willing to die for, as Christ died for him. He does not end his letter to the Romans without naming them: Phoebe, Prisca, Aquila, Epaenetus, Mary, Andronicus, Junias, Ampliatus, Urbanus, Stachys, Apelles, Aristobulus, Herodion, Narcissus, Tryphaena, Tryphosa, Persis, Rufus, Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermes, Patrobas, Hermas, Philologus, Julia, Nereus, and Olympas. It is quite like the list of names with which Cardinal Newman ended his Apologia pro Vita Sua. That is the greatest modern autobiography in the English language, and he named his friends because he had shown them that they were friends of God.

The pantheon of fame has its cracks. I recently spoke with a college student who had never heard of Bing Crosby. The only recognition that matters is how we are known to the Lord. Should we be blessed to meet him in glory, he will not say, “How do you do?” He will not even say, “I think I remember you.” He will say, “Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you” (Jeremiah 1:5).
Make a Donation, of any amount, to the Church of St. Michael.

Our website is http://www.StMichaelNYC.com

The Only Real Prediction, “Heaven and earth will pass away but my words will never pass away” by Fr. George W. Rutler

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FROM THE PASTOR
January 18, 2015
by Fr. George W. Rutler

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A prophecy is a declaration of truths from God: “Thus says the Lord . . .” Because it is a very serious matter to speak that way, our Lord warns against “false prophets who are wolves in sheep’s clothing.” It is inexact to think of a prophecy as a prediction, as when someone who says something will happen on the world scene is said to have made a “prophetic statement.” The confusion is understandable, since when the Lord speaks, there are warnings and promises about the consequences of not obeying the Voice.

Since people are not divine, even those of acute insight can lack foresight. Some of their wrong predictions are amusing, but only in retrospect. In 1876 an officer of Western Union saw no commercial use for the telephone, and before that, in 1830, an inventor said that rail travel at high speed would cause people to die from asphyxia. Even before then, it is said that Napoleon stomped out of a room indignantly when he thought his intelligence had been insulted by Robert Fulton describing a boat propelled by a steam engine. Then in 1807, right down the street from our church, a crowd gathered to jeer “Fulton’s Folly,” but the Clermont did work and made it up to Albany, albeit at five miles per hour.

Pope Innocent III decided that the world would end in 1284, 666 years after the founding of Islam. The Michigan Savings Bank decided against funding Henry Ford’s horseless carriage because it was only a fad. In 1878 Oxford professor Erasmus Wilson confided, “When the Paris Exposition closes, electric light will close with it, and no more will be heard of it.” Hiram Maxim said of his own invention in 1893, “The machine gun will make war impossible.” The New York Times displayed its infallible intuition for fallibility in 1936: “A rocket will never be able to leave earth’s atmosphere.” In 1943 the Chairman of IBM said that there would be a world market for no more than five computers.

These days there are various predictions about climate change, a legitimate concern that should be tempered by caution about turning hypotheses into absolutes. Fifty years ago we were told from many quarters that by now there would be massive starvation caused by overpopulation, and England would be covered in ice, just as the meteorologist Albert Porta thought that an exploding sun would engulf the earth in 1919.

Abraham Lincoln’s self-effacement resulted in a most memorable miscalculation when he said: “The world will little note nor long remember . . .”—in the Gettysburg Address. The Mother of our Lord made an opposite and very accurate prediction, stunning as it was: “Henceforth all generations shall call me blessed . . .” In her case, perfect humility dispensed with natural modesty. John the Baptist was the last of the prophets, which is why any religion that proposes Christ as a prophet but not the Son of God misses the whole point of true prophecy itself.

Christ did make some predictions—the death of Judas, the destiny of Peter, and the destruction of the Temple—but he counseled against worrying about the future. His only prediction we need to know is fulfilled in every generation:

Light, Life, and Death by Fr. George W. Rutler

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FROM THE PASTOR
December 21, 2014
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by Fr. George W. Rutler
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Where there is light there is life. That is a basic fact of botany and biology, and even moss and moles attest to that. While darkening days and cold winds have brought winter early, the season begins officially with the Winter Solstice. The “shortest day of the year” is as long as all the others, but darkness seems to cut life short. It is a good time for contemplating the difference between life and its absence, and so the Church leads ever deeper these days into the mysteries of Death, Judgment, Heaven and Hell. As the opposite of Heaven, Hell would seem to be the last thing anyone would want to think about just before Christmas, but the whole point of the Nativity of Our Lord is that it brings Heaven to earth in order to save us from the darkness of Hell.

Even those who would avoid these mysteries betray some intuition of them when they say in unguarded moments that something “Looks like Hell” or is “Heavenly.” Even an atheist is willing to contradict himself by telling believers to “Go to Hell.” As it is darkest before the dawn, so in these solemn hours when we try to imagine what it is like to be separated from God forever, there is a thrilling sense that something glorious is about to come into the world. Nothing could be more Hellish than the possibility that there is no Hell, for it would mean that there is no moral judgment. It would be like there being no up because there is no down, or no right because there is no wrong.

Every time Christ spoke of the “fires of Gehenna,” he was intimating the eternal Heaven where there is no need of sun by day or moon by night, for the Lamb is the light, and thus all contradictions cease only in that eternal radiance: no darkness in contrast to light and no death in contrast to life. “In him was life, and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness, and the darkness comprehended it not” (John 1:4-5).

To worship is to announce what we think of ourselves, as well as what we think of the object worshiped. That is why the worship of the true God, and him only, is at the top of all the Commandments. We can be Christians living in the “light from light,” which is the uncreated Christ himself, or we can be updated Druids worshiping the darkness and confused by a glimmer of light, but that would make us a perpetual confusion to ourselves. That is a foretaste of Hell where all is chaos in disunity. The truth is different: “Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, nor have entered into the heart of man, the things which God has prepared for those who love him” (1 Corinthians 2:9).

Christmas Gifts

Christmas is an important time of the year to make special gifts to our Lord for the care and work of his “Holy House” of St. Michael’s here in “Hell’s Kitchen.”

This area is now in the midst of the massive Hudson Yards development. Thus we have an unprecedented challenge as a parish. In recognition of this, our parish will remain and will not be merged in the archdiocesan realignment process.

Christmas donations will be a good way of thanking the Lord, and St. Michael, for keeping us here and entrusting to us the work of spreading the Word in this unique neighborhood.

Make a Donation, of any amount, to the Church of St. Michael.

Our website is http://www.StMichaelNYC.com

No one ever gets lost by following Jesus by Fr. George W. Rutler

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FROM THE PASTOR
December 13, 2014
by Fr. George W. Rutler
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In mid-Advent, with the solemn purple on the altars and the days darkening early, the Church suddenly dons rose vestments and admits flowers. Saint John says, when the Light shines in the darkness, the darkness cannot overpower it. In the eighteenth century, when philosophy had lost its moorings in the Scholastic tradition of the Catholic saints and turned inward in a pessimistic way, a friend told Samuel Johnson that he had wanted to be a philosopher, but cheerfulness kept breaking through. Dr. Johnson was a man meant for Gaudete Sunday as, in fact, all of us are. For we are meant for Heaven, and it is Heaven’s gentle joy that breaks through in these days. With all of the comforts of our generation, this world is sad in many ways. Of course, there are the unspeakable sufferings of Christians in many places, and injustice in violent forms, and corruption and stupidity in high places, but there is also a subtle melancholy born of an insensibility to eternal joy.

Christ is the way to Heaven and said so himself. He was prophesied by the voice of his own cousin, John the Baptist, in fulfillment of the words of a prophet almost as great as John: “In the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord; make straight in the desert a highway for our God” (Isaiah 40:3).

When I was a student in Rome, I frequently got lost in the streets that were anything but straight: they were astonishingly winding and crooked in the ancient quarter where I lived, and more than once did I walk into a blind alley. Yet when one asked a local Roman for directions, the answer was invariably: “Va sempre diritto.” (Keep going straight ahead.) I must say it was not very helpful. But that is what Our Lord says each day of our lives. The difference is that he does not point the way, he IS the way. He does not point a finger saying, “Keep going straight ahead.” He says to you and me, as he said to the apostles, “Follow me.”
. That is an incontestable fact, and the saints prove it. The greatest of saints, the Mother of Jesus, is the cause of our joy, Causae Nostrae Laetitiae, because she directs us to the One who shows the way to Heaven: “Do whatever my son tells you to do” (John 2:5). He leads us up no blind alleys.

In 1336, Pope Benedict XII declared in the constitution Benedictus Deus:

We define that . . . since the passion and death of the Lord Jesus Christ, the souls in Heaven have seen and do see the divine essence with an intuitive and even face-to-face vision, without interposition of any creature in the function of the object seen. Rather, the divine essence immediately manifests itself to them plainly, clearly, openly.

Christmas Gifts

Christmas is an important time of the year to make special gifts to our Lord for the care and work of his “Holy House” of St. Michael’s here in “Hell’s Kitchen.”

This area is now in the midst of the massive Hudson Yards development. Thus we have an unprecedented challenge as a parish. In recognition of this, our parish will remain and will not be merged in the archdiocesan realignment process.

Christmas donations will be a good way of thanking the Lord, and St. Michael, for keeping us here and entrusting to us the work of spreading the Word in this unique neighborhood.

Make a Donation, of any amount, to the Church of St. Michael.

Our website is http://www.StMichaelNYC.com

Advent: Get Ready for the Surprise of Christmas by Fr. George W. Rutler

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FROM THE PASTOR
December 7, 2014
by Fr. George W. Rutler
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It would be hard to think of any writer in the last several generations who celebrated Christmas as heartily as G. K. Chesterton. It was precisely because of this, and not in spite of it, that he said with a severity not characteristic of his benign personality: “There is no more dangerous or disgusting habit than that of celebrating Christmas before it comes.”

Dangerous, that is, because the rush neglects the deepest mysteries of life which are the stuff of Advent meditations: Death, Judgment, Heaven and Hell; and by that neglect we are abandoned to a life of anxiety, unable to know why we were made or what we are to become. Disgusting, that is, because rushing Christmas spoils the appetite for higher things and tries to replace holy joy with entertainments that quickly become boring.

Advent is the time to get ready for the surprise of Christmas, and that would seem to be a paradox for there can be no preparation for a surprise. But because Christ is “ever ancient, ever new,” we know ahead of time that his eternal presence will always surprise us, the way he has surprised every generation, by “making all things new.” Note that he does not make all new things, for that is what fashion designers do, which is why they quickly go out of fashion. Rather, he takes what exists already and breathes new life into it. He does that with a weary world, and he does that to all those who give him permission through humble submission to his grace.

This past year, our parishes have gone through a program called “Making All Things New” for restructuring parishes to meet the new needs of new demographics. I did not love the Rube Goldberg elements of the program. But the title is the theme of Advent and of every day of a Christian’s life truly lived. This Advent truly ushers in a new year for the lives of our parishes.

For almost one and a half years I have been Administrator of the Church of the Holy Innocents as well as Pastor of the Church of St. Michael. Both parishes have been given a surprising new lease on life in response to the potential of our neighborhoods. This is a cause for thanks, along with a renewed sense of responsibility. I am very happy that the Church of the Holy Innocents will have its own full-time Administrator beginning on the Feast of the Holy Innocents. Father Leonard Villa is an old friend of mine: I was at his ordination and have watched his fine ministry in various parishes. He is perfectly suited for his assignment, and I am glad that our two parishes will be close to each other, not only physically but spiritually. I shall celebrate my last Mass as Administrator of Holy Innocents at Midnight on Christmas while continuing as Pastor of St. Michael’s as the parish grows.

If you enjoy reading these newsletters, please express your support with a Donation, of any amount, to the Church of St. Michael.

Our website is http://www.StMichaelNYC.com

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